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Researchers at the University of Missouri weren’t speaking about annuities when they pointed out the following, but annuity professionals might want to keep this in mind. 

When one spouse planned, the other spouse also planned; and even though husbands planned more often than wives, the spouses influenced each other, said Angela Curl, an assistant professor in the university’s School of Social Work. The observation came in a study she co-authored with Jerry Ingram, an associate professor at the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff. Here’s the kicker: Previous research has shown that failure to prepare for retirement makes people more likely to be depressed and less likely to make successful adaptation to the life change, the researchers note. On the other hand, the research shows that planning has positive outcomes, such as improved psychological well-being, more financial stability and better role adjustment.

Retirement planning helps mental health

Researchers at the University of Missouri weren’t speaking about annuities when they pointed out the following, but annuity professionals might want to keep this in mind. 

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Older folks steady as she goes

Seventy-five percent of seniors and 60 percent of baby boomers say their financial health hasn’t changed since the recession, according to joint research by Aite Group and Chase Blueprint.

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Who said that?

“You need to determine all the possible sources of income you can draw from.

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